Faramir: INFP

Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien

Faramir INFP | Lord of the Rings MBTI

Dominant Fi: Faramir is private about his feelings, and only shares them with a select few. He makes quick friends with people who can empathize with him in some way (Frodo, Eowyn), but has a hard time having good feelings toward others. He feels deeply hurt by his father’s rejection, but doesn’t feel the need to change his behavior in order to please him. His internal sense of morality holds precedence over his personal feelings, turning him intosomething of a rebel. He always weighs his decisions against this moral code and rarely makes choices that he later regrets.

Faramir INFP | Lord of the Rings MBTI

Auxiliary Ne: Faramir has big dreams and finds himself depressed when he can’t achieve them. He has a rapt understanding of other people and can easily figure out the meaning behind Frodo’s actions, eventually leading him to let the Hobbits go. As a boy, he was distracted, and spent whiles daydreaming rather than completing the tasks his father set to him. He is big picture oriented, which allows him to see the greater importance of small things. He makes decisions with the whole of middle earth in mind, rather than just Gondor (like his father and brother).

Faramir INFP | Lord of the Rings MBTI

Tertiary Si: He holds on to resentments from his childhood, and as a result, finds himself rather sad, but he doesn’t necessarily allow this to encumber his entire life. He has a more traditional approach to protecting Gondor, using old-fashioned methods to find out the enemies’ plans and then prepare for them. He relies heavily on his past experience and learns from his mistakes.

Faramir INFP | Lord of the Rings MBTI

Inferior Te: Faramir isn’t the most logical of people, and often finds himself drawn to making emotional decisions. He isn’t really much of a people person or a leader, but he does have the ability to lead when he needs to. He’s capable of organizing people and devising battle strategies in order to maintain control of Gondor. He is honest in his assessment of himself and doesn’t seek to make excuses for his choices.


Faramir is often typed as an INFJ, however, he’s a clear Fi-user.

5 thoughts on “Faramir: INFP

  1. And I actually see him as INTJ/INFJ in either book and film. It is said that he is very capable leader. Actually a great one. He organised all gondor defenses when there was nobody else to lead it.

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  2. you have no idea how excited I am to see Faramir in a list of INFPs! He’s my favourite character in the book (maybe tied with Treebeard).

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    • To be fair, though, Faramir in the books doesn’t seem to have the same personality type as the one in the movies

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      • You’re correct. The Faramir in the books is an ENFJ. The films played up and in some instances invented the characters’ insecurities so that a wider audience can sympathize with them. That being said, I think Faramir in the film is also an ENFJ.

        Fe – He empathizes with people to a fault, and doesn’t always distinguish what others want from what he wants, which is part of the reason he can’t follow his own wishes. Although he’s a leader himself (Captain of the Guard) he allows Denethor and Boromir to take the center stage in the interests of keeping the peace, and because he feels the lack of open conflict is better for Gondor. His brother’s and father’s egos have put him down for years, to the point where he comes across as an introvert. I get the impression he prefers working outside the city and guarding the borders of Gondor. Because in this position he can lead with confidence, and not only so he can avoid his father’s hostile disapproval. Notice his soldiers are more loyal to him than his father. I personally know several ENF men who are perceived as introverts because their parents, like Denethor, were verbally abusive. Or, because most societies (Gondor wouldn’t be an exception) view feeler men as weak, so it’s common for them to keep this side of themselves private.

        Ni – Combined with Fe, this explains how he can read Frodo and Sam’s intentions and put together what they’re up to. As to the memories of his past interpreted as Si, I think a case can be made that this is instead Ni, where he’s trying to figure out how/why it all happened, in order to find solutions. Also remember that his brother just died – of course that’s going to bring up those memories over and over.

        Se – He can think on his feet well enough to be a competent fighter (he’s still alive in a war-torn country, right?). In fact, in the book Eowyn knows just from looking at him that he’s a match for any of the Rohan fighters. Once Denethor and Boromir are removed from the picture, he has no problem stepping into the role of Steward of Gondor. If he were an INFP, a leadership position would cause him no small measure of anxiety and dread, even if he’s under Aragorn. Not saying an INFP can’t do it, just that Faramir looks too confident at the end. In the book he tells Eowyn straight up how he feels about her when they’re first introduced, and takes immediate action to win her over. An INFP would have to work up the nerve for that before hand, or wait for Eowyn to make the first move.

        Ti – Given that this is his inferior function and he’s still relatively young, it’s easy to see how he relies more on Fe and Ni to make decisions. Also, under stress (which he is in most of the film/book), ENFJs can fall into the grip of this function and become overly critical of themselves and blame themselves for every imagined failure. This can also explain the part in the film when he’s mulling over the memories after learning about his brother’s death – he blames himself for it. It’s also pretty clear he feels like it’s his own fault that his father disapproves of him, which is why he’s willing to die in a last-ditch futile attempt to win him over.

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