The Rules of Character Death

Fair warning: Harry Potter fans may be offended.

The Rules of Character Death: Killing Characters Like You Mean It

I’ve read a lot of books, seen a lot of movies and listened to a lot of plays, and one thing that often determines how much I enjoy those stories is how the writers choose to handle character deaths.

Shakespeare follows a very specific rule set with regards to killing off characters. In simple terms, any character who kills, threatens to kill, or plots to kill another character has guaranteed his own death by the finale of the play. Thus, Hamlet (who plots to kill his uncle) must die, and Claudius (who has killed) must also die. Part of this is Shakespeare stating his own opinions on the immorality of killing, but it also dictates that Shakespeare will never kill a character for no reason. Continue reading

Allan Ginsberg: ENFP

Kill Your Darlings

Allan Ginsberg ENFP | Kill Your Darlings #MBTI #ENFP

Extraverted Intuition (Ne): Ginsberg was all about taking ordinary situations and making them new. Because he was full of ideas, he wrote prolifically, cranking out a large quantity of very long poems in short amounts of time. Even up to the last decade of his life, Ginsberg was putting out quick, vast amounts of poetry. Ginsberg was an open-minded, energetic individual who embraced tolerance and genuinely inspired others to do likewise, not only through his poetry, but through his energetic involvement in counter-cultures. In fact, Ginsberg is attributed to have coined the infamous “flower power” phrase of the 1960s Vietnam era as he encouraged war protestors to engage in peaceful rejection of violence.  Continue reading

Edmund Pevensie: ENTJ

Guest Post by E.J., INTJ

The Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis

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Dominant Te: Edmund takes a logical approach to life, and he hates it when others try to control him. At the beginning of the series, he uses his combination of NiTe to manipulate other people, including his older siblings. He sometimes misses social cues in his effort to analyze the evidence: for instance, in the Beavers’ house, he asks whether the Witch could turn Aslan to stone, which shocks and offends the others present. In joining the Witch’s side, Continue reading

Why Tolkien was an ISTJ

The first thing I’d like to make clear is that Tolkien does not write like an INFP. Though he was known for not finishing projects he started on and for working in “idea bursts,” his writing does not express an Ne-style creativity. If you want a better example of very INFP writing, look to Neil Gaiman as your (exaggerated) example.

Having studied medieval literature at the university level, it is clear to me that Tolkien did not come up with most of his “ideas” himself. Almost all of the cultures and concepts found in Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, and the Silmarilion are literally borrowed aspects of the medieval era literature he was obsessed with. If you need evidence of this, here you go:

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  • Wergild: the individual naming of weapons and treasure found in Anglo Saxon culture, wherein each treasure was unique and one of a kind. Where do you think Sting, the Arkenstone and Mithril came from?

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J.R.R Tolkien: ISTJ

Guest post by E.J., INTJ

J.R.R. Tolkien ISTJ | The Book Addict's Guide to MBTI #ISTJ

Introverted Sensing (Si): Tolkien’s mother died when he was eight years old, and his memory of her motivated him throughout his adult life. Since her family had abandoned her after her conversion to Catholicism, and her health had subsequently deteriorated, Tolkien considered her a martyr. Her memory was part of the reason why Tolkien became such a staunch Catholic. Continue reading